Income Tax Office

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I-821D DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS

 As a lawful permanent resident (or green card holder), there are certain benefits and protections provided to you while you live in the U.S. However, until you are a citizen of the United States, there are certain restrictions you may encounter. If you are interested in having the full benefits that any other U.S. born citizen has, you will need to go through the naturalization process to apply for citizenship.
Qualifications for U.S. Citizenship
In order to obtain citizenship, you will need to meet the following qualifications:
You are 18 years old or older
You have good moral character
You are familiar with U.S. government and history
You are a permanent resident of the U.S.
You have been here for at least five years or three years if you are married to a citizen


If you want to know about the additional requirements or need additional information about any immigrant petition or process please call us for a free consultation at (323) 597-1595 

Consular processing

I-485 Adjustment of Status

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services permits a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident in a same-sex marriage to a foreign national to file for immigration benefits just as any heterosexual married couple.   USCIS will not automatically reject an application as a result of the marriage being between same-sex couples. 
If you are a United States Citizen and married to a foreign national of the same sex, and same sex marriage is permitted where you married, your partner may be eligible to receive immigration benefits if all other marriage qualifications are met. 
Immigration benefits through marriage require various supporting documents and proof as to the validity of marriage.  


For that reason it is important to get a consultation, for more information please call us at (323) 597-1595.

Same Sex marriage

Immigration and Naturalization Services

Adjustment of status is the method a foreign national can use to become a lawful permanent resident while they are currently living in the U.S. This process in an alternative method to obtaining a immigrant visa, which is usually done through a U.S. consulate while the individual is abroad. This is referred to as consular processing.
Depending on processing times at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, adjustment of status can be more effective and the preferred option for immigrants for several reasons.
These include:

  • Avoids expenses and inconvenient travel times back to homeland

  • Applicants are able to gain employment authorization

  • Applicants have permission to travel while process is pending

  • There are more alternatives should an application be denied by USCIS


If you need additional information about any immigrant petition or process please call us for a free consultation at (323) 597-1595

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VISAS AND PETITIONS

I-751 Removing Conditions from Residency

If a couple has been married for less than two years at the time residency is granted, the beneficiary will acquire conditional residence (CR) and be required to later remove this condition. A conditional resident (CR) may remove the condition on permanent residence by jointly filing a petition (Form I-751) with the U.S. citizen spouse within a 90-day period prior to the expiration of the second-year anniversary of the grant of conditional residence.
In the event that the resident spouse is unable to jointly file Form I-751, he or she may file for a waiver of the joint-filing requirement on Form I-751.
Three such waivers exist, and may be granted if the noncitizen spouse can demonstrate any one of the following:
Extreme hardship would result if the individual was to be removed;
The marriage was entered into in good faith, but has been terminated (other than through the death of the citizen spouse); or
The marriage was entered into in good faith, but the resident spouse was abused or subjected to extreme cruelty..  


For that reason it is important to get a consultation, for more information please call us at (323) 597-1595.

VALDEZ PROFESSIONAL MULTI SERVICES

Consular Processing allows a beneficiary of an approved immigration petition, who is abroad and has an immigrant visa number immediately available, to apply for an immigrant visa at a U.S. consulate overseas.
The National Visa Center (NVC) regulates this area of law.   Their duties include the following: 
•      To notify the petitioner and beneficiary when the visa petition is received;
•      To notify the petitioner and beneficiary when an immigrant visa number is about to become available;
•      To notify the petitioner and beneficiary of when they must submit immigrant visa processing fees; and
•      To notify the petitioner and beneficiary of when they must submit supporting documentation.

Once a visa becomes available, the U.S. Consulate in your country will assist you with the following:
•     Contact you to schedule you for an interview;
•     Complete the processing of your application; and
•     Determine whether you are eligible for an immigrant visa.

If the application is approved, you will be issued an immigrant visa, which is good for only six months.  The visa will expire if you do not enter the U.S. within that period of time.
If you are located within the United States, you do not have to apply through consular processing.  Instead, you may apply for an adjustment of status.
Consular processing can be a lengthy and confusing procedure for that reason it is important to get a consultation, for more information please call us at (323) 597-1595.


If you need additional information about any immigrant petition or process please call us for a free consultation at (323) 597-1595

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Oficina de Income Taxes

The K-1 category permits the fiancé (e) of a U.S. citizen petitioner to enter the United States for a 90-day period. Upon marriage to the petitioner within 90 days of arrival, the K-l fiancé(e) may apply for adjustment to conditional permanent residence (I-485).
The minor unmarried children of a K-1 principal beneficiary who are listed in the petition may be given K-2 status if they are joining the beneficiary. There is no separate petition or separate filing fee is required in such cases. The issuance of a K-2 visa must within one year from the date of issuance of the K-1 visa to the principal beneficiary, the fiancé (e) of a U.S. citizen. The minor unmarried children of the K-l beneficiary may also adjust status to conditional permanent residence (I-485).
As a non-immigrant visa, the K-1 beneficiary will be given a single entry visa for 90 days in order to carry out the marriage to the petitioner. They may be allowed to perform authorized work during this time. K non-immigrants are ineligible for an extension of stay or change of status (I-539)


If you need additional information about any immigrant petition or process please call us for a free consultation at (323) 597-1595

N 400  NATURALIZATION / CITIZHENSHIP

​​​​K-1 & K-2 Visas

​​I-130 VISA PETITIONS

On June 15, 2012, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced that individuals who entered the United States as children and met certain guidelines could request deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and then apply for employment authorization.
•    Key eligibility requirements for deferred action are that the individual:
•    31 years of age or younger as of June 15, 2012
•    Arrived in the U.S. younger than 16 years old
•    Consistently lived in the country from June 15, 2007 up to now
•    Resided in the U.S. on June 15, 2012, as well as at the time of pursuing deferred action


If you want to know about the additional conditions or need additional information about any immigrant petition or process please call us for a free consultation at (323) 597-1595

Who are these visa petitions for?
•    Petitioner: U.S. citizen and aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence (Green card holder)
•    Beneficiary: Qualified relatives of U.S. citizen and green card holder
•    Purpose: Immigrant petition filed for Beneficiary upon establishment of certain category of Relationship with Petitioner
Before an individual can apply for an immigrant visa or adjustment of status based upon family ties, USCIS must first approve the alien relative petition (Form I-130), confirming that the necessary family relationship exists.

Not all family relationships serve as a basis to apply for Lawful Permanent Residence status (LPR). The two basic categories are
1) Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens and
2)  Preference immigrants.


1) Immediate relatives of U.S. Citizen

Have no cap on the number of visas include spouses, parents of U.S. citizens, and children that are under 21 years old.


2) Preference Immigrants
•   F1: Unmarried sons or daughters of U.S. citizens (i.e., those who are 21 years of age or older
•   F2A: Spouses / children of lawful permanent residents
•   F2B: Unmarried children of lawful permanent residents
•   F3: Married children of U.S. citizens
•   F4: Siblings of U.S. citizens, if such citizens are at least 21 years of age


What happens after it is approved?

After an approval of the I-130 petition, the alien relative who is physically outside U.S. can apply for an immigrant visa through a U.S. consulate abroad, a process known as “consular processing” (CP). Upon approval of the visa, the person may travel to the United States and be inspected to ensure compliance. Once inspected and admitted into the USA, the person is considered to be a permanent resident.


Want to know more about it, give us a call at 323-591-1595 to set an appointment and explain to you how we can help you to achieve your needs